Bulova Dior 23 (1972?)

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hoytbrood hoytbrood
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Bulova Dior 23 (1972?)

Hello,
I was going through a box of jewelry the other day and found a watch that I acquired during my career as a pawnbroker. It is marked as a 'Bulova Dior 23' on the face. The watch is square, with 14 diamonds studding the sides perpendicular to the band, which is a knit-style gold band. There is a J and arrow symbol on the back, followed by a 14ct marking. The date code is N2. The band is also marked with the J and arrow symbol. I am curious about any information about this watch.

I understand that N2 denotes a 1972 production year, and the J denotes the maker of the case and band. I found an almost identical watch on ebay, but it lacked the '23' marking. What other information is readily available about this watch, and where would be reputable places to find more information about it?

I will post pictures when I get my connection to upload them properly (cell phones don't seem to like the image uploader). :)
watchophilia watchophilia
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Re: Bulova Dior 23 (1972?)

This post was updated on .
Hi, Hoytbrood.  It sounds like you have a good handle on your watch already.  What else would you like to know?  

You are correct that N2 indicates a manufacture date of 1972, and the J with the arrow is the case maker.  Specifically, that was the symbol for Jonell Watch Case Co, which made many cases, both solid gold and gold filled--for Bulova during that time period.  The Diors were designed by--you guessed it--Christian Dior.  There were numerous lines of the Diors, and they were constructed of varying materials, including solid gold and diamonds, sterling silver, and gold plated.   Some of them had 23-jewel movements--and appear to indicate that fact with "23" on the dial--and some have 17-jewels. The ads I have indicate that the various watches were assigned numerical model identifications, rather than names.  For example, model #50060.  They were sold through fine jewelry and department stores.  I have only ever seen one example of a man's Dior model, and it was amazingly plain, whereas the abundantly available ladies' models are strikingly contemporary and eye catching, IMO.  I have quite a few of them in my collection, including some that I haven't gotten posted yet.  I think they are exquisite examples of 1970 design trends.
- Lisa